All SSI recipients, both children and adults, will be subject to a medical continuing disability review (CDR) from time-to-time, to determine if they continue to meet the disability criteria of the SSI program.  For most recipients, the medical CDR will occur every three to five years.  The purpose of the medical review is to determine if the recipiant’s condition has medically improved and, if it has, to determine if that medical improvement is such that it renders the recipient no longer disabled under SSI criteria.  If there is no medical improvement, or if there has been medical improvement but the individual still meets the SSI disability criteria, SSI benefits will continue.  If there has been medical improvement and the individual’s disability no longer meets the SSI disability criteria, the SSI benefits will be terminated subject to the right to appeal that decision.

All children who receive SSI based on the childhood disability criteria will be subject to an Age 18 Redetermination when they reach age 18.  The purpose of this medical review will be to determine whether the recipient meets the separate SSI disability standard for adults.  Unlike the medical CDR, which looks for evidence of medical improvement, the Age 18 Redetermination is a new, initial determination and follows the same review process used for any new adult application for SSI.  If SSA determines that the recipient's condition meets the SSI disability standard for adults, benefits will continue.  If SSA determines that the condition does not meet the disability standard for adults, SSI benefits will be terminated subject to the right to appeal the decision.

See our separate Toolkit, Medical Continuing Disability Reviews and the Age 18 Redetermination for more in depth information on this topic.

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SSI and Medical Reviews